• TUAdLaw – Guide

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    What is the TUAdLaw?

    The Thammasat University Admission Test for Law (the “TUAdLaw”) is a test used as a part of the admissions process for the International LL.B. Program in Business Law. The TUAdLaw does not test your knowledge of law or any other academic subject. Instead, it is designed to assess your aptitude for the skills required to study law at undergraduate level in English at Thammasat University. The TUAdLaw helps our Law Faculty make fairer choices in selecting students, and is used to supplement the other information that you provide in the admissions process.

    What is the format of the TUAdLaw?
    The TUAdLaw is a three and a half hour test, split into two sections:
    Section 1 is a multiple-choice exam, which you will have two and a half hours (150 minutes) to complete. You will be asked to read passages (in English) and answer multiple-choice questions testing your comprehension of the passages. There will be approximately 50 multiple-choice questions in this section. The passages will be approximately 200-500 words in length, and will be taken from a variety of sources (newspaper articles, books, academic journals etc.). There will also be some shorter passages with questions testing your logical reasoning ability. This section of the TUAdLaw is designed to assess your ability to read and comprehend complex English passages, and to test your verbal and logical reasoning ability. The Program requires you to be able to read and understand very challenging material in English, and to be able to analyse effectively the logic used by the author. No knowledge of law or any other subject (other than an excellent grasp of English) will be required to answer the questions. Two example passages with multiple-choice questions are provided below.
    Section 2 requires you to write one essay from a choice of two questions. You will have one hour (60 minutes) to complete this section of the test. The Program requires you to be able to express yourself clearly and fluently in formal English, to develop well-structured, logical arguments and to write them in essay form. This section allows you to demonstrate your skills in this area. The questions are on general (usually non-legal) topics. The questions do not require any specialist knowledge, but are based on common issues which are discussed in the media and in schools (and which you should therefore be familiar with). The questions are worded in such a way that there will not be a ‘correct’ or ‘incorrect’ answer: we want to see your ability to write a reasoned and supported argumentative essay in English. A set of two example essay questions is provided below.

    How can I prepare for the TUAdLaw?
    There are no facts to learn or materials to revise in preparation for the TUAdLaw. We do not recommend that you pay for coaching and we advise you not to readily believe people who claim that they can help you improve your test score by coaching. We do not endorse any individual or organisation that claims to be able to prepare you for this test. Instead, we recommend that you regularly read complex English passages (for example, in good English-language newspapers), make sure you understand them, and think about the issues that are raised and the arguments that are presented. If you want to take practice tests, you may consider trying practice questions from other sources: for example there are practice questions for the LNAT and LSAT freely available online. You should be aware that the level of difficulty of these tests is different from the TUAdLaw (as the LNAT and LSAT are aimed at native English speakers and, in the case of the LSAT, at graduate students). However the skills that are tested and the format of the questions are similar.

    SAMPLE QUESTIONS

    SECTION 1: MULTIPLE-CHOICE SECTION

    Passage I Please read the following passage and answer the questions below: The 18th century saw Sir William Blackstone in England proclaiming the significance of natural law in his Commentaries on the Laws of England. Blackstone (1723-80) begins his great work by espousing classical natural law doctrine – as if to consecrate English law by this appeal to God-given principles, an attitude that drew the fire of the Utilitarian philosopher and legal and social reformer Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832), who derided natural law as ‘a mere work of the fancy’. Despite his scorn, natural law has been exploited to justify revolutions – especially the American and the French – on the ground that the law infringed individuals’ natural rights. The American Revolution against British colonial rule was founded on an appeal to the natural rights of all Americans, in the lofty words of the Declaration of Independence of 1776, to ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness’. As the Declaration puts it, ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights’. Equally rousing sentiments were included in the French Declaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen of 26 August 1879 which refers to the ‘natural rights’ of mankind. And natural law implicitly underpinned the Nuremberg war trials of Nazi officials which established the principles that certain acts constituted ‘crimes against humanity’ even if they did not violate particular provisions of the positive law. The judges in these trials did not appeal explicitly to natural law theory, but their judgments exemplify an essential acknowledgement of the idea that the law is not automatically the exclusive criterion of right and wrong. No serious analysis of law and morals can be conducted without reference to the concept of natural rights. Moral claims are regularly transformed into moral rights: individuals assert their rights to a whole range of goods, including life, work, health, education and housing. In the legal context, rights have acquired significance so profound that they are sometimes regarded as synonymous with law itself. On the international front, a panoply of human rights conventions and declarations attest to the strength of rights talk and reveal, at least in theory, a dedication by the international community to the universal conception and protection of human rights. It demonstrates a remarkable degree of cross-cultural accord among nations. (from Law: A Very Short Introduction, Raymond Wacks (OUP, 2008), abridged)
    Question 1 Which of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage?
    (A) There is a remarkable degree of cross-cultural accord among nations on the subject of human rights.
    (B) No serious analysis of law and morals can be conducted without reference to the concept of natural rights.
    (C) The concept of natural law can be used to justify revolutions.
    (D) In the legal context, rights have acquired significance so profound that they are sometimes regarded as more important than law itself.
    Correct Answer: B

    Question 2 According to the passage, which of the following is correct?
    (A) Sir William Blackstone was a Utilitarian philosopher.
    (B) The American and French revolutions demonstrate cross-cultural accord among nations on the protection of human rights.
    (C) The judgments in the Nuremberg war trials show that the law is not the only way in which we can decide whether actions are right or wrong.
    (D) The French Declaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen was founded on an appeal to ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness’.
    Correct Answer: C

    Question 3 What is implied by the words ‘a mere work of the fancy’ at the end of the first paragraph of the passage?
    (A) Natural law plays no part in English law.
    (B) Natural law is confusing.
    (C) Sir William Blackstone thought natural law was an important concept for English law.
    (D) Jeremy Bentham disagreed with the concept of natural law.
    Correct Answer: D

    Question 4 What (unstated) assumption is being made in the final (fifth) paragraph of the passage?
    (A) The fact that many human rights conventions exist means that there is cross-cultural accord among nations.
    (B) The fact that few human rights conventions have been signed means that most countries agree on the definition of human rights.
    (C) Cross-cultural agreement between nations is not remarkable.
    (D) The international community is dedicated to the universal conception and protection of human rights.
    Correct Answer: A

    Question 5 What is stated to be a ground used to justify the American and French revolutions?
    (A) Natural law.
    (B) Jeremy Bentham’s scorn.
    (C) The law infringed individuals’ natural rights.
    (D) The Nuremberg war trials.
    Correct Answer: C

    Passage II A tennis club hosts a special tournament every year on 1 September. It accepts into the tournament only those players who pay the entry fee by August 1 and who have won a major tennis tournament during the previous calendar year. Ms A, a successful professional tennis player for many years, paid the entry fee by August 1 to be in the tournament this year. The tennis club accepted Ms A to play in the tournament.

    Question 6 Which of the following conclusions follows logically from the paragraph?
    (A) Ms A won a major tennis tournament the previous calendar year.
    (B) Ms A has played in the tournament in previous years.
    (C) Ms A is well known for her professional tennis career.
    (D) The tennis association asked Ms A to enter the tournament.
    Correct Answer: A

    SECTION 2: ESSAY SECTION
    Please write an essay answering one of the following questions
    1. What laws would you create to protect Thailand from the spread of Ebola virus from other countries?